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June Fourth marked the 23rd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre. To recognize the anniversary, this edition examines Chinese media news.

The Chinese government clamped down on search engine terms related to the 1989 massacre, an incident where the government opened fire on hundreds of student demonstrators. Words that relate to the incident, such as fire, people, blood, tanks, are banned, according to China Digital Times.

State-sponsored hackers targeted Google email accounts in China, CNN reported June 6. Users can see a message at the top of their browser that says “Warning: We believe state-sponsored attackers may be attempting to compromise your account or computer.” Google advises users to be more creative about their passwords.

A Chinese official said it’s the government’s duty to publish air quality results and discouraged other embassies from reporting the data, according to the state-owned newspaper, Xinhua. China accused the U.S. embassy of publishing tweets of air pollution readings. The Chinese government said the tweets disregard the Vienna convention and interfere in China’s internal affairs.

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