Francisco Condori, 14 years old, came with his family some months ago to the Cerro Rico from a remote village in a rural area of the Potosi province, called Tinguipalla. His father had no mining experience but he found a job for a minimal wage. The cooperative offered them to settle in one of the tiny house attached to the pithead in order to take care of the materials and get for free a place to sleep. At this room–no bigger than 5 o 6 square meters–  have rest six members of the family: Francisco, his parents and his three sisters. Now they have become immutable to unbearable noise from the deepness of the mine and the compressor which is placed at back of the house. Day and night.

Mineritos: Bolivia’s child miners

Many photographers would wait decades to tackle shooting tough subjects like child labor in Bolivia’s mines. Not Daniel Burgui Iguzkiza, a...
A refugee family in front of her tent with the UNHCR letters on barrels in the background, Sept. 3, 2013. (Copyright Flo Smith/NurPhoto/NurPhoto/Corbis / APImages)

Slideshow: Syria’s refugee crisis

Syrian children who fled with their families from the violence in their village, sit on the ground at a displaced camp in the Syrian village of...