Project Exile: Iraqi BBC cameraman struggles in U.K.

"They consider us traitors, spies. I was worried about my children." Qais Najim spent more than a decade as a cameraman and editor for the BBC in his native Iraq, where he covered the U.S.-British invasion...

Inside the Islamic State’s favorite app

"They just want to feel relatively secure right now, or for the lifetime of whatever operation they're plotting." The messaging app Telegram has gained notoriety recently for its use by the Islamic State, or...

Project Exile: Photographer smuggled out of Syria

"When you are doing anything against the regime, you will be wanted and arrested." Bassel Tawil was once a network engineer with an internet company in the Syrian city of Homs. That changed in 2009 when...

Explainer: Libya’s fractured politics

Three governments means little governance News this week that a new United Nations-backed government had begun to establish itself in Libya has been greeted as a hopeful sign that the country may emerge from...

Tunisia at a crossroads

Islamic State, corruption hinder lone Arab democracy Five years after Tunisians toppled dictator Zine El-Abeddine Ben Ali, the country is at a crossroads. The North African state has successfully ratified a...

Four questions: War in Yemen

A primer on Yemen's conflict Yemen's year-old civil war has left more than 6,000 dead, 30,000 injured and 2.5 million forced from their homes. Yet outside the region, there is little news coverage of Yemen's...

Gulf states struggle amid depressed oil prices

New taxes and cuts to government spending spur economic pain As the Arab Spring swept across the oil-rich Persian Gulf five years ago, the region's monarchies and authoritarian states were able to quell...

Citizen journalists report Syria conflict to world

Much of Syria has become a no-go zone for foreign correspondents, leaving locals to fill the void. Malek Blacktoviche was once a Java software programmer in Aleppo, Syria's commercial capital and largest...