Zhang Ping

Project Exile: Chinese dissident forced from family

"I will never give in. I cut contact with my family because I love them." On March 19, the exiled Chinese journalist Zhang Ping wrote an article for the website of Deutsche Welle criticizing the detention of...
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Project Exile: Chadian blogger finds French asylum

"It is a common local practice. You get offered a high position, a car, and you change sides." Chad's President Idriss Déby once said "a world without a press is like a body without a soul." Yet despite...
Russia volunteers attend the opening  ceremony of World Cup Volunteers Programme ahead of the 2018 football tournament in Moscow, Russia, June 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

For Russia, World Cup poses myriad challenges

Ukraine, security and corruption complicate 2018 tournament With the world’s attention set to shift to crisis-riddled Brazil for the 2016 Summer Olympics, one government in particular is likely watching how...
In this March 28, 2016 photo, a porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base camp near Lobuche, Nepal. The April 2014 avalanche, which killed 13 Sherpa guides and three other Nepali workers, was an immense blow to the Sherpa community. Nearly all the surviving Sherpas refused to continue working that year, demanding, among other things, better working conditions, more insurance, and free education for the children of those killed. Over the past two years the government has enacted a series of policy changes, from stationing officials at Base Camp to creating a welfare fund for the families of the Sherpa dead, in large part to convince climbers and trekkers to keep coming back to Everest. (AP Photo/Tashi Sherpa)

‘Sherpa’ highlights Everest’s inequities

  Sherpa guides and porters do much of the work of getting foreign hikers up Mt. Everest. But despite doing an incredibly dangerous job in a lucrative industry, they receive just a small fraction of the...
Qais Najim (courtesy)

Project Exile: Iraqi BBC cameraman struggles in U.K.

"They consider us traitors, spies. I was worried about my children." Qais Najim spent more than a decade as a cameraman and editor for the BBC in his native Iraq, where he covered the U.S.-British invasion...
Workers dismantle the 65-foot Lenin statue standing on the bank of the Dnieper River by the Dnieper Hydroelectric Station as part of Ukraine's "decommunization," removal or changing names of all Soviet-era communist symbols, March 16, 2016. The statue was taken down the following day. (Frank Folwell)

Fall of Lenin statue highlights Ukraine tensions

Soviet symbols still elicit division in Ukraine Upon arrival in the gray, industrial city of Zaporizhia in March, rumors were swirling: Ukraine’s largest remaining statue of Vladimir Lenin was slated to...
An Iranian man shows Telegram app messages from supporters of female conservative candidate Zohreh Elahian, on his mobile phone in Tehran, Iran,  Feb. 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Inside the Islamic State’s favorite app

"They just want to feel relatively secure right now, or for the lifetime of whatever operation they're plotting." The messaging app Telegram has gained notoriety recently for its use by the Islamic State, or...