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Rea Hederman has twice left his mark on American journalism. In the 1970s and early 1980s he changed his family’s flagship paper, The Clarion-Ledger of Jackson, Miss., from a voice for segregation and racism into a Pulitzer-winning force for change in the Deep South.

Since 1984, he’s been the owner and publisher of the New York Review of Books, helping it maintain its place as one of the English-speaking world’s preeminent intellectual publications even as technological change has shaken the industry.

Hederman, who recently won a Missouri Honor Medal for distinguished service to journalism, speaks on this edition of Global Journalist about his conflict with his family in Mississippi and his efforts to ensure the New York Review continues to thrive.

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